Place

Kattegatcentret, Grenaa

Project

Sea in the stomach

Year

2011

Tecnologies

Microsoft Kinnect, RFID, .Net, Flash

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Sea in the stomach

On the 12th of October 2011 Kattegatcentret struck their doors open to a new experience zone called 'Sea in the stomach'. The exhibition is created in collaboration between Cordura, Poco Piu and Kattegatcentret.

'Sea in the stomach' consists of three main activities about sustainable fishing and algal characteristics and growing conditions. The experience zone contains four interactive installations, which each bring their own way to communicate about the road from the marine food chain for sea food on the dinner table.

Seafood Restaurant
In the virtual Seafood Restaurant, visitors can 'enjoy' a sustainable menu.
At the restaurant table, which consists of a large screen, dishes with delicious fish dishes rolls across the screen, and the visitors are free to 'order' the dinner they want.
The restaurant guests sit around the 'table' at their own 'mat', which consists of a touch screen. By a single 'touch' the guest get the menu 'served' on the screen in front of them. On a big screen in front of the guests an expert appear (a biologist from Kattegatcentret), who tells about the selected fish and whether the menu selection is sustainable (green category) or not (red category).

Catch a fish
Based on Microsofts Kinect, Cordura has developed the game 'Catch a fish'.
Players have 60 seconds to catch as many green sustainable fish as possible and be todays top scorer. At the same time the player has to avoid catching the red - unsustainable - fish in the game.
'Catch a fish' is a physical game in which the visitors must use their whole body.

Algae Laboratory
In the algae lab, visitors can learn about algae properties and growth conditions using two interactive communication installations.

Algae Treasury
On an interactive poster in the algae lab, visitors can explore the 'Algae treasury'. The guests can insert flasks with different properties - using RFID tags - and see what algae for example, is used for biofuel, anticancer medicines, nutritional supplements, red dye and much more. Visitors can also find algae with more features and explore what products the algae is a part of. On the interactive poster there's a description of the algae and a voice tells about the properties the algae possess.

In the 'Algae Treasury' the visitors learn about the algals many properties, and that the algal are part of everyday life - for an example in toothpaste, ice and medicine.

Keep the algae alive
In the installation 'Keep the algae alive', the visitor has to create the best growing conditions for the algae and thereby grow as many kilos as possible and keep them alive. In fierce competition with their neighbor, the visitor can adjust the parameters: light, heat, food and stirring depending on the algae needs and thereby create a lush growth of algae. During he game warning signs will appear if the algae gets too much light or too little food. The operation of the game takes place through physical taps and cranks, so the visitors get the experience of operating a real algae tank.